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I can't see Hugh EatAlltheRoadKillasWell in there, surely all carnivores have Hugh on their shelves?

PS Those stairs are darned clever, do you have a system for knowing what's in which?

DGR, if you look again you might find Hugh in all his carnivore glory.

As for the stairs, most of the family know what is in each. I just open them up and take a look - works every time.

Those are the coolest stairs I've seen. What an ingenius idea!!!!!


Honestly, this "series" of posts have been the most self-indulgent and gratifying piece of toss I have ever seen on this blog. Exactly, what were you attempting, supposed John Peel of Books, by doing this?

We know that you are a big reader, you told us how many books you get through, so what sort of insecurities are there in your life are there that you feel that you need to justify your previously destroyed postings about the extent of your library.

This was purely an ego massage on your behalf and frankly, very boring and pointless. Sorry.

I like looking at books just about as much as I like reading them. So thanks for pictures. But the chef with the orange cookbook, is Stephanie Alexander, not Sheila. That was a fairly big error. You should take it off the shelf of unused cookbooks.

No need to apologise BTTS, everyone else seemed to enjoy them. I tend to find that people with a real love of books have a compulsive curiousity regarding the bookshelves of others, I know I do. Subscription to that belief is not compulsory though.

Well corrected Johnson, and to think that all I needed to do was lean forward and double check before typing.

Lighten up Bookseller! These posts have been lots of fun. And what is the point of accusing someone of being self-indulgent when they have already held their hands up and said as much in the post itself? Disagreeing with a blog post and saying so is one thing, just being unpleasant for the sake of it is quite sad if you ask me.

Well, I'm always fascinated to see what books people actually live - I've enjoyed the 'series'. The whole point of the great website http://www.librarything.com/ (which I know has been blogged about on here before) is that people are able to browse and share their libraries with each other on line. This is just the same idea but with pretty pictures.

What about the children's bookshelves? Also, have you seen these? http://shedworking.blogspot.com/2006/12/unwrap-garden-office-this-christmas.html

A very good point Alex, and the honest answer is that I couldn't get into their room when I was taking the pics as they were doing something secretive and had the keep out sign clearly displayed on the door. I will post a supplementary entry sometime soon, if only to wind up BTTS.

Hang on a minute. So posting pictures of your bookshelves (nice stairs by the way) on a blog about books is in some way inappropriate but creating an entire online persona around the fact that a few celebrities buy books in your shop is perfectly acceptable? Bookseller To The Stars? Celebs buy all manner of things in all sorts of shops. Should we expect Shoeseller To The Stars? Window Cleaner To The Stars? Checkout Girl To The Stars?

Actually, Window Cleaner To The Stars might be a good idea.

I was intrigued by this 'John Peel of books' tag BTTS. So I quickly searched online and it appears that only person to ever refer to Big Mouth in such a way is you. Poor form to imply otherwise in your post methinks.

And to wind up bookseller further, you can enter your pixs in a librarything contest. They WANT pictures of books:


But it ends soon, I think. Luckily you have the pixs. All you have to do is choose the best one. :>)

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Quick Flicks

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    Jonathan Powell: Talking to Terrorists: How to End Armed Conflicts
    Part-memoir, part-how-to-guide, this book, by a chap who has negotiated with terrorists in Ireland, Sri Lanka, Palestine and elsewhere, looks at why it is vital that governments talk with terrorists rather than attempt to destroy them. A measured and fascinating book. (****)

  • Geert Mak: In America: Travels with John Steinbeck

    Geert Mak: In America: Travels with John Steinbeck
    The author travels in the footsteps of John Steinbeck, 50 years after the authors 'Travels With Charley' book, to see how America has changed in that time. I liked the fact that this was just as much a social history as a fan's reenactment. (****)

  • Joanne Parker: Britannia Obscura: Mapping Britain's Hidden Landscapes

    Joanne Parker: Britannia Obscura: Mapping Britain's Hidden Landscapes
    I'll be honest, it took me a while to work out what this book is about. The author takes a fresh look at the British Isles through a variety of different maps, analysing what they can tell us about this country of ours. So she looks at a caver's map, a map of ley lines, of flight paths etc. Quite short, for a non-fiction book, and I'll definitely be reading on. (****)

  • Ian Mortimer: Human Race: 10 Centuries of Change on Earth

    Ian Mortimer: Human Race: 10 Centuries of Change on Earth
    I like the idea of this book, a history of the previous millennium broken down into centuries, a chapter for each, and focusing on human development across that time. An engaging read so far. (****)

  • Ken Liu: The Grace of Kings

    Ken Liu: The Grace of Kings
    Cracking opening set piece in this alternative China/Japan mash-up fantasy novel. (****)

  • Constantine Phipps: What You Want

    Constantine Phipps: What You Want
    A novel told entirely in verse, rhyming couplets in fact. It is a brave move, and I applaud the author's courage, but, for me, the story just wasn't interesting or well-rounded enough for me to bother reading on. (**)

  • Jeanette Winterson: The Gap of Time: The Winter's Tale Retold

    Jeanette Winterson: The Gap of Time: The Winter's Tale Retold
    Part of a series of Shakespeare plays retold by modern authors. They call this a 'cover version' in the introduction, which I find appealing, but the story is a bit of a slog so far, to be honest. (***)

  • Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick

    Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick
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One You May Have Missed

  • Ian Holding: Unfeeling

    Ian Holding: Unfeeling
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Books Read: 2015