« Don't Feel Obliged... | Main | The Name Above The Door »


Scott - thanks for this. It is very good and useful to see some actual numbers - albeit for just one ebook. There is so much specualtion around about ebooks that is based on some apparently very wild guesses. Hopefully we'll begin to see some more pubishers reveal some actual numbers so the whole industry can do some proper planning and a little less panicking.


Splendid. Or in other words... that *that* sucker.

This is really fascinating. Thanks for this. How many new ebooks are there available in comparison to printed books in a year? I would have thought this also might have a bearing. And who is the ebook demographic would you say?

Really eye-watering stuff.


Very similar viewpoint from 2002 that still holds true.

Thanks--excellent info.

I asked a question on the UK amazon boards about what constitutes a "bargain" book. Results were interesting especially compared to the same question over on the US boards (I didn't ask there, several other people have posted that question in the last year.)

Here's the recent question with comments on the UK boards:


Overall, I'd say that in the UK, book buyers expect to pay more, whereas in the US, the population is quite taken with the 99 cent books that were around in wild numbers for a while. But anything under 5 US dollars seems to be considered a bargain (with some getting stuck at 3 dollars). As for the UK--well the answers were often "relative" to hardback and/or softback.

Very unscientific and all that--but hey, it's always fun!


It strikes me that - with ebooks presumably getting a large number of 'impulse' buys - so much also depends on the searchable criteria that's associated with the book, the categories that it's filed in and loads of other stuff that publishers have (presumably) thought a little bit about in the past, but perhaps haven't really focused on up to now.

Search Engine Optimisation for e-books, if you like.

So I guess if I were a publisher I would want detailed real-time data from the online retailers - how are people finding the big sellers? What lists are they on? What were the buyers searching for? So you could then optimise your wotsits.

This book introduced me to the brilliant "The story of the little mole who knew it was none of his business", which I have lately been reading to my niece, much to her parents' bemusement. And now I have discovered there is a 'plop-up' edition, which has made me happy beyond description.

Which is just to say - I'm glad It Is Just You is still selling, as it's full of lovely little things like that.

The comments to this entry are closed.

My Books

Currently Reading

Kindle Sampled

Quick Flicks

  • Jonathan Powell: Talking to Terrorists: How to End Armed Conflicts

    Jonathan Powell: Talking to Terrorists: How to End Armed Conflicts
    Part-memoir, part-how-to-guide, this book, by a chap who has negotiated with terrorists in Ireland, Sri Lanka, Palestine and elsewhere, looks at why it is vital that governments talk with terrorists rather than attempt to destroy them. A measured and fascinating book. (****)

  • Geert Mak: In America: Travels with John Steinbeck

    Geert Mak: In America: Travels with John Steinbeck
    The author travels in the footsteps of John Steinbeck, 50 years after the authors 'Travels With Charley' book, to see how America has changed in that time. I liked the fact that this was just as much a social history as a fan's reenactment. (****)

  • Joanne Parker: Britannia Obscura: Mapping Britain's Hidden Landscapes

    Joanne Parker: Britannia Obscura: Mapping Britain's Hidden Landscapes
    I'll be honest, it took me a while to work out what this book is about. The author takes a fresh look at the British Isles through a variety of different maps, analysing what they can tell us about this country of ours. So she looks at a caver's map, a map of ley lines, of flight paths etc. Quite short, for a non-fiction book, and I'll definitely be reading on. (****)

  • Ian Mortimer: Human Race: 10 Centuries of Change on Earth

    Ian Mortimer: Human Race: 10 Centuries of Change on Earth
    I like the idea of this book, a history of the previous millennium broken down into centuries, a chapter for each, and focusing on human development across that time. An engaging read so far. (****)

  • Ken Liu: The Grace of Kings

    Ken Liu: The Grace of Kings
    Cracking opening set piece in this alternative China/Japan mash-up fantasy novel. (****)

  • Constantine Phipps: What You Want

    Constantine Phipps: What You Want
    A novel told entirely in verse, rhyming couplets in fact. It is a brave move, and I applaud the author's courage, but, for me, the story just wasn't interesting or well-rounded enough for me to bother reading on. (**)

  • Jeanette Winterson: The Gap of Time: The Winter's Tale Retold

    Jeanette Winterson: The Gap of Time: The Winter's Tale Retold
    Part of a series of Shakespeare plays retold by modern authors. They call this a 'cover version' in the introduction, which I find appealing, but the story is a bit of a slog so far, to be honest. (***)

  • Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick

    Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick
    Got quickly and totally sucked in to this novel about the chap who first came up with The Pickwick Papers. A ripping yarn. (****)

One You May Have Missed

  • Ian Holding: Unfeeling

    Ian Holding: Unfeeling
    Unforgettable novel told from the point of view of the son of a white Zimbabwean farmer whose land is reclaimed by an armed mob. I thought it was an oustanding debut and am surprised the author didn't go on to bigger and better things.

New Arrivals

Big Mouth at the Movies


Dipping Into

Now Playing

Books Read: 2015